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Post your videos as file attachments here. One video per topic please!

Moderators: sg, mods

User avatar
By gerg
#75608
I hope to fly Kiwanda this summer...
Mental Note: Don't fly far out over the water...
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By tokyoDirk
#75627
nice turns, transition to down tubes, and an ok flare

but umm... why did he land into the water?
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By Redbeard
#75654
bradgeary wrote:all i see is a video no longer available message
if it won't show for you, click the "link" on the lower left hand side and watch it there.
User avatar
By sg
#75749
Looks like he did some things right after the incident. He stayed with the wing floating, instead of trying to swim for it and surely freezing to death.

Anyone know of any better tactics for staying warm? I wonder if he tried balling up on the sail? Maybe that made him sink so he decided to lay flat on his back? Anyone know what may have been the best heat saving position?
User avatar
By designbydave
#75750
sg wrote:Anyone know what may have been the best heat saving position?
landing on the beach?
User avatar
By knumbknuts
#75751
designbydave wrote:
sg wrote:Anyone know what may have been the best heat saving position?
landing on the beach?
:shark:
User avatar
By ddreg
#75752
So hang gliders float?
User avatar
By saltoricco
#75756
sg wrote:Looks like he did some things right after the incident. He stayed with the wing floating, instead of trying to swim for it and surely freezing to death.

Anyone know of any better tactics for staying warm? I wonder if he tried balling up on the sail? Maybe that made him sink so he decided to lay flat on his back? Anyone know what may have been the best heat saving position?
OK, here is from memory of what we were taught at sailing. I haven't yet watched the whole video, but from what I saw he was in a good position to conserve body heat. Flat on the surface kept him as much as possible out of the water. Without a PFD it's difficult to keep a stable position without spreading arms and legs, and that's what he did. Clothes left on, good. Swimming would have drained his body heat at a much faster rate, so unless he knew he would make it within 20-30 minutes it was safer to stay with the glider. I've been in 55F water swimming for 30 min and couldn't have gone any longer.

Holger
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By saltoricco
#75760
ddreg wrote:So hang gliders float?
For a while they do. Until all air is out of the tubing and the sail. Then they sink.

Holger
User avatar
By red
#75795
Campers,

Hollywood strikes again! :crazy:

When I flew the coastal cliffs of Okinawa, we (usually) wore an old-style Scuba-diving Buoyancy Compensating Device (BCD) under the harness, which is a fairly conventional life vest with leg loops, and a *huge* inflation tube. You could fill it by mouth in two or three puffs, within seconds. I never needed mine, but I practiced inflating it fully, even on short final, and it was a good answer. It was easy to flare and land normally on the beach, even with the BCD inflated.

Some HG pilots came down in pounding surf with a BCD, at the base of a cliff, and they just paddled out of the surf, and waited leisurely for a rescue boat. We *theorized* that a submerged pilot could even re-breathe the air in his vest for an extra few minutes, with no loss of buoyancy, but we never saw any submerged pilots. Even with a sinking glider draped over them, the BCD held up the sail and pilot safely, while they unhooked.

Many HG pilots there flew with a child's partly-inflated toy air mattresses (very light in weight and airfoil-compliant), stuffed into each wing, inside the double surface. The glider was totally unsinkable, then, and made a reasonable life-raft; just do not try to stand up on it. :)
User avatar
By Lobido
#75805
I plan to wear the inflatable arm rings.
User avatar
By batt0
#75809
What was he thinking, or doing?
The commentary says that "the strong winds kept pushing him out to see". :crazy:
Did he take off in onshore conditions and then, boom, it turned offshore? Just like that. Me thinks not.
Or is it just fucked up journalism again?
Looks like he just had a brain fart. He should have just turned downwind and crash on the beach.Or better still. Not fly at all. Anything is better than going into the water.f---ing silliest thing I've seen in a long time :wtf: :run:
User avatar
By jjcote
#75824
Bear in mind that what's in the video is a reenactment, and we don't actually know what the guy did.

I will say that I was reminded about the apocryphal tale of the guy who was flying a coastal site, and started circling with some bird. The bird showed him where there was lift, and he followed. Then the bird started soaring out over the water, and the pilot followed and was amazed to find lift there as well. And the bird soared out farther, and the hang glider followed, and to his delight continued to gain some altitude. And then when they were a substantial way out, the bird turned around... and started flapping. (Maybe not so apocryphal?)
By Jonathan
#75882
" We *theorized* that a submerged pilot could even re-breathe the air in his vest for an extra few minutes, with no loss of buoyancy, but we never saw any submerged pilots." Says red.

Impossible. The human lungs are not strong enough to breathe in after exhaling while under more than a few feet of water with out the aid of presurized air. The water pressure is too great, and its just not possible. Scuba tanks, via the mouth regulator (which measures/compensates for the pressure of the surrounding water), actually inflates your lungs to help you breathe.

Next time you in a pool with a garden hose near by... take the end of the garden hose and use it as a snorkel. See how far down you can swim and still breathe. Do this at your own risk.... keep in mind not to try for too long, as you are essentially rebreathing the same air as its not really mixing in the length of the hose....
User avatar
By red
#75895
Jonathon,

Are you a SCUBA diver? I am. Certainly, you can not breathe with a snorkel, under more than a few feet of water, but that is NOT what was proposed. You CAN and often do breathe air into your BCD at ANY depth, because the BCD and your lungs are under exactly the same water pressure. The volume of that air will be reduced, depending on the depth, but re-breathing the BCD air would be quite possible. The old-style BCD vests (which we used for flying) actually do surround your lungs, so there is no difference in the pressures involved. At any rate, the idea was based on a pilot being only a few feet under water, in the first place.

I still do not think it would be wise to do that, except maybe as an alternative to drowning, due to the risk of lung infection (who *knows* what organisms might live in a BCD?). Like I said, we *theorized* about doing this. Many HG pilots in Okinawa are also SCUBA divers (they have a Barrier Reef there, like Australia, only much smaller). All of the divers (including me) agreed it was possible, but nobody thought it was anything but an extreme alternative. Again, we never saw a HG pilot get submerged, even when the glider was sinking, when they had a BCD. If you add a few bucks worth of two toy air mattresses inside the double surface of the glider, the glider can't sink, either.
Jonathan wrote:
Red wrote:" We *theorized* that a submerged pilot could even re-breathe the air in his vest for an extra few minutes, with no loss of buoyancy, but we never saw any submerged pilots." Says red.
Impossible. The human lungs are not strong enough to breathe in after exhaling while under more than a few feet of water with out the aid of presurized air. The water pressure is too great, and its just not possible. Scuba tanks, via the mouth regulator (which measures/compensates for the pressure of the surrounding water), actually inflates your lungs to help you breathe.

Next time you in a pool with a garden hose near by... take the end of the garden hose and use it as a snorkel. See how far down you can swim and still breathe. Do this at your own risk.... keep in mind not to try for too long, as you are essentially rebreathing the same air as its not really mixing in the length of the hose....
User avatar
By TomGalvin
#75898
Hey Red, how long were you on the Rock? I was saw hang gliders there in the early 80s, but I took flying lessons at Futenma instead.
User avatar
By red
#75899
TomGalvin wrote:Hey Red, how long were you on the Rock? I was saw hang gliders there in the early 80s, but I took flying lessons at Futenma instead.
Tom,

Two years, Kadena AFB. You were there before I was; I had the only Comet II and Fledgling on the island. They told me it was gonna be a tropical paradise, and it snowed on the north end of the island, a day after I got there.
:)
Welcome to Okinawa (snow is almost unheard of, there, really).
By Jonathan
#75901
Red,

Seems like we have to do a myth busters test here. Next time I am at the parents pool (maybe this weekend), I am going to inflate a camel back bladder (my test breathing apperatus), put on a back pack full of rocks and walk into the deep end with my set up. I'll try to take a breath at 1 foot, 2 feet, 3 feet, and 4 feet, etc..

Just before I do this, i'll make sure to say,"Hold my beer, watch this." I am pretty sure that what most peoples last words are when they attempt a stunt like this.

Then we will know if this myth is busted....

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