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All things hang gliding. This is the main forum. New users, introduce yourself.

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By Denray
#404655
About 25 years ago I quit flying. Chickened out. Had 3 incidents within a 2 week period where the last one almost took my left knee off.
At about the 2 hr mark, around 1978 I blew a bluff launch, turned around, and stuffed it. Result was a compressed vertebrae resulting in a questionable recovery. That led me to a sit down wearing a tie job. F me. Figured I'd never fly again. I asked dog to make me well again and if so I would never fly again. ha. Each of 2 times during recovery that I started feeling better I started thinking about flying and I would go into a down spin. So I knocked it off.
2 years later I had transferred to a different part of the state. A new buddy took me on a hike at the top of a 7k foot mtn. There was 5k vert to a landing area. Got a Comet and started flying again. Have around 500 hours, 400 in the mtns. Always had vg tight, once in the air.
Poor launch and landing areas along with my go for it attitude caused my retreat from the sport. At 65 now I've mellowed a bit. On vacations in Europe i'd see PG's and a few HG's and I would be thinking "turn, turn, your're going to blow thru it". ha.
So if I were to step back in I probably would not be flying a lot because I've got a pile of things I do, but was wondering about what would be a good glider for an old goat. I weigh 185. My 70 year old buddy, Phil Godwin, flys a Freedom 17.
P.S. I've always been thinking about getting back into it.
P.S.S. I got into mtn biking after my knee deal. On 12-4-13 I broke my back. And on 4-12-14 hiked to the bottom of the GC and back up in one day.
By USHPA7
#404677
Check out my post about my 1st high flight after 39 years.

Before that I spent time at Dockweiler Beach doing launch and landing practice and building confidence.

Frank Colver
By blindrodie
#404712
Any good single surface wing should work for you. Conditions, conditions, conditions is what I would pay close attention to...

8)
By Denray
#404750
My last glide. Mylar, heavy sail, speed bar, gloves and vario on left, cb on right. Sometimes I could talk to people 100 miles away on that radio shack cb. That's the 7k mtn that got me going again.
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By Ken.de.Russy
#404759
The safest way to fly infrequently has to be by maximizing your safety margins. That has to mean choosing equipment, site and conditions in the most conservative way possible, pretty much how you would demand an instructor to guide a loved one with little or no experience. This means choosing an easy sloping launch clear of obstacles with an easy glide to a large obstruction free LZ as well as choosing low wind and stable conditions. Choose equipment that is equal to the safest available. The conservative choice would be a glider designed as an entry glider rather than some compromise between entry level and step up performance. I would select a current state of the art wing designed and built by those with the most experience at building entry level gliders.( If I needed brain surgery I would choose a doctor with the experience of many thousands of the surgical procedures like what I might need, versus someone with 20 or 30. This is not rocket science.) If you are fully committed to maximizing your own safety you already know this is the correct answer. If anyone knows of a safer approach I would love to hear it.
By Denray
#404792
My first rig was a little different.
Oh look, I even have a cast on my right arm. I wonder what that could be from?
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By maaglide
#404793
If this is "Den" of Denny Waters fame, you can jump back into it! D.W. was the best pilot in our area, a real natural, but yes also pretty aggressive! If indeed you are D.W., we flew the Bally together a few times (now looking at a photo you or Phil took on my first flight there). At our age we still need some level of aggressiveness for safe launching and landing, but too muchgo-for-it and our brittle bones will not take it. I just came back after 10-yrs off and it was mostly like riding a bike (tho yes with one weak launch into manzanita) With your experience and natural abilities I dont think you would have any trouble so long as you ease back into it, eg fly the Bluff and Mattole before heading back to the Bally. I think you would do fine w an intermediate glider (Sport 2/3) as they are so easy to fly, in my opinion.

If this is you, give Leon or me a call to chat - Mark (four niner seven 46O3)
By USHPA7
#404796
Stoked after my first high flight in 39 years. The file was still there in my brain, not opened for 39 years but it opened and went into operation as soon as I launched.

Even a spot landing! :thumbsup:

Frank Colver
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By miraclepieco
#404861
Denray wrote:
Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:56 pm
My last glide. Mylar, heavy sail, speed bar, gloves and vario on left, cb on right. Sometimes I could talk to people 100 miles away on that radio shack cb. That's the 7k mtn that got me going again.
What I noted first was the French Connection - yikes!

Yeah, those big boxy Radio Shack portable CB radios probably cost us 2 points of glide :-(
By Denray
#404883
Well I spoke with Mark and we discussed what a lousy area it is here in Eureka, CA for HG. 2 to 3 hrs to the closest nice fly if it happens to be working that day. Many landings on twisty river bars. He's moving well inland soon.
I'm going to stay out of it for now. I do kayaking, rafting, hiking, mtn biking, and skiing in the meantime. Just retired last October. Started getting all jacked up about hg, but my jets are cooling.
Doing those other sports you are close enough you can laugh, touch, and drink beer with your buddies. Oh, and the campfire discussions usually don't include talks about people getting snuffed out.
I do miss the bird brain and may yet return.
Thanks for the comments.
Photo shows lots of fun, low risk, and nice scenery.
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By miraclepieco
#404884
Denray wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:15 pm
Doing those other sports you are close enough you can laugh, touch, and drink beer with your buddies. Oh, and the campfire discussions usually don't include talks about people getting snuffed out.

Photo shows lots of fun, low risk, and nice scenery.
Beware: two of my closest buddies survived decades of hang gliding, only to die in separate kayaking incidents. I can only surmise that kayaking is far more dangerous than hang gliding.
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