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#404598
O-K Guys Chris here. The Rank amateur aspiring R-C Pilot. What I would like to know is this: Could I set up a Sail-Plane with Video Feed back in {real time}? Also could I do the same thing with a vario?
User avatar
By Takeo77
#404600
You can do FPV flying and have ALL of the instruments you would in a full scale aircraft, including a vario, you'll also need some specific data like distance from your ground station, RSSI of the RC system and return to home direction. It just gets overlaid on the video feed. If you got time to do some reading check this forum out

https://www.rcgroups.com/aircraft-electric-fpv-861/
#404602
Roadrunner71 wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 7:29 pm
O-K Guys Chris here. The Rank amateur aspiring R-C Pilot. What I would like to know is this: Could I set up a Sail-Plane with Video Feed back in {real time}? Also could I do the same thing with a vario?
I don't do FPV but I set up my Taranis radio to give a real-time beeping vario tone plus a spoken call-out of altitude every 30 seconds.
By Roadrunner71
#404604
O-K Guys, First off: Let me sat that I am just coming out and saying that I simply do not know what F-P-V =, or R-S-S-I stands for. So please enlighten me, Thank-You.
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By red
#404608
Roadrunner71 wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 11:24 pm
O-K Guys, First off: Let me sat that I am just coming out and saying that I simply do not know what F-P-V =, or R-S-S-I stands for. So please enlighten me, Thank-You.
Chris,

RSSI means Received Signal Strength Indication, which tells you when you are close enough (or high enough) for good control and video. Do not let a building or a hill block your signal, so you can maintain control.
FPV means First Person Viewpoint, or seeing exactly what the RC mini-pilot would see from the RC sailplane, in real time, including the vario.
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User avatar
By DMarley
#404616
Chris,
The main reason I started R/C flying was to hone my approach skills in HG as well as to better understand air currents near the ground and obstructions.
I saw that FPV was developing at a rapid rate, and decided I would like to try this technology. However, I had to develop my R/C flying skills first and foremost.
There is a LOT of detailed tech stuff that it helps to understand to get into FPV. At this point, I would not consume much time on that part of R/C flying. Get yourself some simple three-channel (throttle, rudder, elevator) conventional-planform (main wing with aft horizontal stab/elevator/rudder) model that is as near to bullet-proof as you can. Get your brain wrapped around the controls with that craft, then graduate gradually to more complex models. At some point, you will feel more confident with your skills so that you will be able to put FPV gear on your craft without the fear of loosing your stuff. FPV gear can initially be reasonably inexpensive, but it can become quite complex and expensive. Try to hold off on the FPV, for you really need to develop the skills to reliably control your craft from line of sight (your eyes looking at your model in flight). For some people it's a piece of cake, for others it takes more practice.

It's not a bad idea to develop your understanding of FPV and all it's gear, frequencies, etc. There is literally tons of information on the web. Start your studies now if it might peak your interest. But keep it as simple as possible for now and develop your stick controls for reliable flying. This may take awhile!
It is a fun challenge!
By USHPA7
#404756
I started flying RC gliders about 1960 when i built my own radio gear. I was very much into competition during the sixties until May 23, 1971 when the first hang gliding meet was held. RC gliders took a back seat to hang gliding but I always had at least one glider to fly if the urge hit me (most of the RC gliders I flew were my own design)

I definitely think the RC experience over those years helped me when i learned to hang glide,

Jump to the present: I bought a cabin in the southern desert and because it was near the mountains it had a much wider variety of native desert plants, some of them quit tall (ocotillo for instance) and there was no open area to land gliders except my dirt driveway which i had to approach high because it turned so i had to drop in. Any mistakes can be dramatic, like chopping cactus in half etc.

Landing an RC glider with any degree of good glide was a gamble. Thank God for foam wings. I could cut and install long flaps and my fortunes changed. Now with the flaps down almost 90* my gliders landed more like hang gliders. It was fun developing the landing techniques using the flaps. Quite often I will lower the flaps at the end of my down wind leg just before the turn to cross wind so that I'm slowing and dropping fast in the cross wind leg.

Every glider I've added flaps to has been fully controllable with the flaps down. You do have to mix in some elevator correction, usually a little down but I have one model that required some up mix for a good glide angle. You don't want to stall or to drop into a steep glide either when the flaps are lowered. You shpould be able to raise and lower flaps with very little disturbance to the glide angle.

Frank Colver
User avatar
By red
#404761
USHPA7 wrote:
Tue Aug 28, 2018 9:10 pm
I started flying RC gliders about 1960 when i built my own radio gear.
Landing an RC glider with any degree of good glide was a gamble. Thank God for foam wings. I could cut and install long flaps and my fortunes changed. Now with the flaps down almost 90* my gliders landed more like hang gliders. It was fun developing the landing techniques using the flaps. Quite often I will lower the flaps at the end of my down wind leg just before the turn to cross wind so that I'm slowing and dropping fast in the cross wind leg.
Every glider I've added flaps to has been fully controllable with the flaps down. You do have to mix in some elevator correction, usually a little down but I have one model that required some up mix for a good glide angle. You don't want to stall or to drop into a steep glide either when the flaps are lowered. You shpould be able to raise and lower flaps with very little disturbance to the glide angle.
Frank Colver
Frank,

Something that you can investigate (with the new radio technology) would be raising both of the ailerons a bit, mixed in with the flaps being lowered. This trick is called "crow," and it's about like tossing out the sky anchors. You almost might think that your RC glider has now stopped, and is hovering, but really it will just land in a shorter space. Any decent RC soaring club will be able to show it to you, either at the clubhouse or in flight, or both. I would not be surprised if some of the RC Simulators for PCs will have this feature on some gliders, so you can practice without risking the RC plane.
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User avatar
By DMarley
#404779
Plenty of flap/aileron/elevator settings and suggestions for crow on RCGroups.com and other RC forums.
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/index.php
I use a Taranis that allows me to be a pro mix-master! I usually experiment with my crow settings on my powered platforms. Depending on the platform, I sometimes have a crow-on transition period that allows the craft to adjust to the new crow settings during one or two seconds. Usually the Crow-off is instantaneous.
After achieving satisfactory results, I transfer the programs to the sailplanes and tweak as necessary. Yup. Floats like a brick.
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