.

.

All things hang gliding. This is the main forum. New users, introduce yourself.

Moderators: sg, mods

User avatar
By lizzard
#401160
I have always wanted to try a drogue but never made the commitment .My question,after seeing a few mistakes is ,why cant they be designed to be retracted or have the ability to wind them in or adjust them as needed ?
That would make them versatile ..it does not seem complicated to do so but like most things there is usually much more to it .
A string in the middle of the canopy seems the most stable method ..thoughts?
User avatar
By NMERider
#401161
lizzard wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:40 pm
I have always wanted to try a drogue but never made the commitment .My question,after seeing a few mistakes is ,why cant they be designed to be retracted or have the ability to wind them in or adjust them as needed ?
That would make them versatile ..it does not seem complicated to do so but like most things there is usually much more to it .
A string in the middle of the canopy seems the most stable method ..thoughts?
Adding a center pull line is a recipe for more trouble than it's worth. The fact is that the drogue I use is adjustable as I have already described in my last post. I have made over 100 landings with drogues and not easy ones either. I'm talking about high-consequence landings and not merely convenience or easy practice. Pilots who have no experience don't understand. Does a single surface glider convert back and forth in flight to a topless race glider? No. If you can't set up an out-landing in a single surface glider then you have no business flying X/C or even flying locally in any kind of performance glider.

Anyhow, the drogue is retractable in the following way: Slow down to MCA and go upright in order to wake and blanket the drogue. It will collapse. Reach back with one hand while flying with the other and reel it in by sliding your free hand along the bridle and up the shroud lines. Done carefully, you can stuff it under you torso in a cocoon harness or inside a partially unzipped pod harness. It's highly unlikely to stuff it back into a deployment pouch.

Here's some good news. Let's say you're setting up to land out and the drogue is active. You hit some good lift in a location that's in range of your bailout field. Slow down to min sink and start turning. I have no problem turning and climbing at min sink with my 60" drogue. Once established in the thermal I have the opportunity to reach back and grad the bridle and maybe one shroud line. That allows collapsing the drogue. I may have to wait until later to stuff it away.

It's extremely important to never place any part of a drogue over the control bar under any circumstances. Never allow a drogue to possibly get draped over the rear wire either. Honestly it's best just to land the glider once the drogue is deployed. Once you have used one of the good ones that Dustin sells you'll forget about all these complications and learn deployment techniques that suit your own style of flying and circumstances.
User avatar
By DAVE 858
#401172
Ive been wanting to get one but my harness does not have a pocket for it. I imagine I could get one made fairly easily. Did you have to make your own reserve pocket? I know some harness come pre-made with one. That is the only reason I haven't gotten one yet.
User avatar
By red
#401173
DAVE 858 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:03 pm
Ive been wanting to get one but my harness does not have a pocket for it. I imagine I could get one made fairly easily. Did you have to make your own reserve pocket? I know some harness come pre-made with one. That is the only reason I haven't gotten one yet.
Dave,

Any decent home sewing machine can use outdoor (UV-proof) upholstery thread, which is a thread far too strong to break bare-handed. Regular sewing machine needles will do the job for you. Fabric shops will have outdoor upholstery thread, in black, white, & various colors. They will probably have some plenty-tough materials for the pocket as well, or maybe try a camping retailer for the material.

A walking-foot sewing machine is not really necessary IMHO, but if you want one, a walking foot is a simple tack-on part for most home sewing machines. They cost about US$20.00 or so. This site has a wide variety of these gadgets, to fit most brands of sewing machines:

https://www.sewingpartsonline.com/walki ... 60444.aspx

Fabric shops can usually tell you where to find good sewing experts, if you need some help with that project.
User avatar
By NMERider
#401181
DAVE 858 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:03 pm
Ive been wanting to get one but my harness does not have a pocket for it. I imagine I could get one made fairly easily. Did you have to make your own reserve pocket? I know some harness come pre-made with one. That is the only reason I haven't gotten one yet.
I needed a drogue pocket installed on the outside of my Wills Wing Flylite3 harness and they mounted this one which worked out great: http://imageevent.com/aero92/dragchutepocket
It's a lot bigger than necessary for the 60" FFE drogue. I needed it for my large experimental drogues make from stiffer fabric and having larger pack volumes. The little Velcro square are to secure a deployment handle in place. Deployment handles are not essential. As long as you can grab the folded up chute when you need it. Simpler is better. I no longer use a snap shackle either but use a 2.5mm Maillon Rapide quick link that cannot be accidentally tripped. I had two LZ overshoots due to the snap shackle opening by mistake. Simpler tends to be better.
By Biffadams
#402427
DAVE 858 wrote:
Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:55 am
blindrodie wrote:
Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:41 am
I see your point Dave, however it's good to have all the tools in one's bag on landing. The figure 8 it totally a good approach in the right conditions, be that weather or the pilots inability to judge wind direction/speed, ground sped and height angles, especially when going XC. YMMV.

8)
No, the figure 8 approach is NOT a good tool. It is the result of bad habits and poor decisions. It is the direct result of an inability to fly precisely and nothing else.
The figure eight approach is a great tool to have in ones toolbox.
User avatar
By NMERider
#402433
Biffadams wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:38 am
DAVE 858 wrote:
Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:55 am
blindrodie wrote:
Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:41 am
I see your point Dave, however it's good to have all the tools in one's bag on landing. The figure 8 it totally a good approach in the right conditions, be that weather or the pilots inability to judge wind direction/speed, ground sped and height angles, especially when going XC. YMMV.

8)
No, the figure 8 approach is NOT a good tool. It is the result of bad habits and poor decisions. It is the direct result of an inability to fly precisely and nothing else.
The figure eight approach is a great tool to have in ones toolbox.
I had to pull a hard figure 8 due to turbulence and thermals breaking off or would have missed the LZ at Sylmar last time I flew there even though I started with a nice DBF. We don't have flaps, spoilers or engines so we need as many good arrows in our quivers as we can. Figure 8s are just one of many tools we should all have at our disposals in case we err or the weather bites our asses. And it will.
By Biffadams
#402524
NMERiders experience in the above post is an excellent example of why it’s wise to have a loaded toolbox.
User avatar
By DMarley
#402545
Excellent material here in dbf, 8's, s, and those rare, loooong final approaches.
I'm still a fishbowl pilot, but longing to stretch my legs. I was initially taught at LMFP to ALWAYS do a dbf on their LZ, when possible. Certainly, their LZ is giganto, a stupid-easy glide from launch, and nearly perfect compared to everything else I've been flying into after moving on from LMFP. The LZ's I typically encounter are much smaller, with not much choice in landing direction options. One is an extremely small RLF that is about four wingspans wide by perhaps 300 ft long, surrounded by tall trees on 3.5 of the four sides, barbed wire fence over a stream for an obstacle, and a very narrow cut through the trees allowing for a diving approach. Other LZ's are uphill landings without much other options and plenty of tall obstacles creating fun downwind conditions. All good practice for outlandings.
Anyway, some of the LZ's are appropriate for dbf, iff you have sufficient altitude, adjusted for the inevitable boat-load of sink. Some of the sites I have flown, if you don't get up above the ridge, you must bee-line it to the LZ, hope for the best, unless you can snag a thermal or two. Many times doubtful in the heavily treed, lush, green environs we fly. If no thermals tagged, then there are no possibilities of completing a dbf. Figure 8's , or just half of an eight, have saved my butt a few times. Especially when you find yourself in lots of sink. Of course, once a site is understood well enough and flown more than once or twice, the sink can be circumvented much of the time. However, I like flying new sites. It helps train me to be spontaneous in my decision making. Which is very much required for XC flying. So, just to add to the discussion, DBF's are not the end-all, be-all solution to every LZ approach. As Jonathan mentioned, we do not have the luxury of auxiliary power to correct for unknown atmospheric conditions and as such must be more spontaneous in our approach decisions compared to powered GA, COM, and MIL operations. Sailplane pilots are very much in a similar boat as we, and they take advantage of varying approach patterns as well when required.


A question I have about the last stages of the final, and I've seen a couple different ideas on the subject of hand transition timing.
As newb pilots, most are instructed to transition a few hundred feet AGL. That's fine for benign conditions. As I advanced, a good pilot friend and mentor of mine strongly suggested I change my thinking about transition timing and do my transitions while skimming in ground effect. "Fly it all the way down to the ground on the control bar" he suggested. You never know if a thermal will attempt to pry you off of your glide slope. Especially within the restricted, thermal-prone LZ's we fly into (funny, the LZ's seem to be the best sources of thermals). A pilot has much much more control over the ship while on the control bar compared to flying on the downtubes. An experience at LMFP had me wishing I had a lot more downward pitch control on the downtubes on final, with some similar experiences at other sites. ...Until I decided to attempt to fly the ship all the way in on the control bar, just as my mentor suggested. I believe this has resulted in nearly all my post landings being much more graceful, spot-on, and spectator-approved, even with mid-day, flat or fly-on-the-wall landings.

I have noticed that many advanced pilots still prefer to transition quite high AGL. And video has shown that sometimes they cannot adequately control their glide slope because of the much more limited mechanical advantage of being on the downtubes.
I wonder if some pilots fear the late transition will end poorly with the possibility of incorrect hand placement within ground effect? I have done a bit of practice at high altitudes, and found that hand transitions can become fluid, smooth, quick and accurate. Executing fly-on-the-wall landings leaves precious little time between rotation and flare for hand transitioning, but I find it not a problem with some altitude practice. Granted, I'm still solely flying the Falcon and I have zero experience on anything else of higher performance. But I'd like to hear how other experienced pilots think and execute their hand/body transition timing.
Also of interest would be the hand/body transition timing while on approach with a drogue deployed.

Thanks!
User avatar
By kukailimoku2
#402546
Re: hand position...

In a DBF final approach I always transitioned the hand that would be on the inside of the turn to final, made that turn, stabilized my final approach and then transitioned the other. I was never a big fan of the ground-skim-on-the-basetube move as getting drilled means you lead the crash with your face.

As for maneuvering on the downtubes, I always saw the issue as one of practice. If the ONLY time you're flying with your hands up is on final then you're not going to be great at it due to a lack of airtime in that configuration. The only way to 1) get comfortable and 2) learn how to really fly that way is to spend time doing it and experimenting when you're high enough off the ground to allow for mistakes. If you cruise your local site vertically for a while with your hands up high I suspect you'll find 1) that you really can fly just fine up there and 2) what hand position is right for you.

No flaring up there. Bad things happen.
User avatar
By red
#402547
DMarley wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 1:41 pm
As newb pilots, most are instructed to transition a few hundred feet AGL. That's fine for benign conditions. As I advanced, a good pilot friend and mentor of mine strongly suggested I change my thinking about transition timing and do my transitions while skimming in ground effect. "Fly it all the way down to the ground on the control bar" he suggested.
An experience at LMFP had me wishing I had a lot more downward pitch control on the downtubes on final, with some similar experiences at other sites. ...Until I decided to attempt to fly the ship all the way in on the control bar, just as my mentor suggested. Thanks!
DMarley,

I suggest taking the middle ground, on hand positions. You do lack pitch authority, when flying thumbs up on the uprights. Flying to the ground on the basetube means a low transition of both hands, often in the gnarliest air of the flight. Instead, make the approach with one hand on the basetube, and one on the uprights. You will still have the full-range of pitch authority, and you only need to transition one hand to the upright, when low on final.

Now sure, this is not as easy as it sounds. I recommend getting vertical in the harness with one hand up on the upright, and one hand down on the control bar, while you are still soaring at altitude, and long before you are even thinking about your approach. Try the this technique with the right hand up, and then with the left hand up. Use the hand position that is best for you. It will take some time to get comfortable with this technique, and your body will feel somewhat "sideways" to your flight path, at first. Rolling out of a turn on the correct heading will be a little tricky. These are not serious challenges, though, and you should adapt quickly. Experiment (at altitude) with flying fast and slow, and turning tightly or widely. You can be upright or almost prone in the harness, as needed. Practice making DBF approaches while far above the LZ, at first. I believe it will be worth the learning, for you. Make your usual approaches, until you are really comfortable and capable when flying with the "one up, one down" hand positions at altitude. Then (and only then), use the new hand positions on approach.

Use this new technique only at the biggest, friendliest LZs available to you, at first. Get good at it, long before you try it in a RLF.
User avatar
By Dave Jacob
#402548
I would agree that too many pilots transition too early. In particular I've seen some videos where the pilots shift their hands up the down tubes to a flare position while they are still 100 feet off the deck. That loss of control at altitude would give me a lot of anxiety.

I certainly feel you should unzip early. But as you say, landing in an active LZ often mean needing a lot of control. While you can fly it hard into ground effect while prone, there is risk in that approach and I'll only do it in nice conditions. Most pilots I fly with will stagger the transition by only transitioning one hand to the down tube and leaving the other on the control bar. While not as good as prone, this provides much better control than when you have both hands up. Transitioning of the second hand occurs once in ground effect and after the speed has bled down to something near trim. I think this is the best approach for a rowdy LZ.

If you must have more ability to pull in, there is an obvious but uncommon trick you can practice. Next time you are at a safe altitude in smooth air go upright, pull in, and then shift your legs under and in front of the control bar. This has a very powerful effect so approach it carefully. Obviously only shift as much weight as you need and then be ready to easy off. I use to do it when I would do beat up landings. My intermediate glider required balling up to get the speed I wanted for the maneuver but that didn't work well when my harness was unzipped. Pushing my legs and body forward felt like it gave me the same dive as balling up and I could do it unzipped. But like I said, practice this and ease into it until you get the feel for it.
User avatar
By DMarley
#402550
Thanks guys.
I've been executing my body transitions on base or during "8's", with hand transitioning completed after rotation into GE, for the entire past season now... not new to me and it is my preferred MO. I transition my right hand to the downtube in a pronated grip (thumb down) just after my legs exit from the harness while on base or during the last sections of an 8. I've found that I am most comfortable with my dominate hand (right) on the DT in any turn direction. So with the left hand on the control bar, I have a triangulated posture within the control frame that allows me very fast and positive roll and pitch control inputs.
After listening and talking with my mentor, I saw this vid from Robert Booth showing some of his "intense landings."

After seeing his vid, things started making a lot more sense, and It seems that I have modeled my landing procedures after Robert's transitioning practices, which have proven for me, time and again, that this works very well in a turbulent, restricted LZ, especially if I need to execute a very steep approach to avoid tall obstacles within the glide path.
So, after rotation and wings level, I merely move my right hand up the downtube, and transition my left to the left DT. After some practice, I've never had any doubt or fear of making contact with the ground at such close proximity, though the fly-on-the-wall approaches can be a bit daunting with that wall approaching quickly.

Last fall I did some scooter towing on a BIG open LZ that allowed plenty of landing experimentation (26 landings in two days!), many of them in some nice chunky, windy conditions. I was mildly scolded for an 'overly aggressive' landing I made. However, this aggressive landing provided me the immediate confidence in that I could extricate myself from the non-optimal dbf situation I found myself in, with lots of sink on the downwind side over trees, and executed a high 180 degree turning and diving approach through a cut in trees, into a very RLF while avoiding the tall obstacles, followed by a perfect landing.

The only problem was, the vid camera's battery gave out moments before the dbf approach began.
The 2nd approach and landing into this same LZ was better executed in that I did a series of 8's before the diving final, and the local pilots all approved it with thumbs up.


(Practice at Blue Sky)
So here you can get an idea of my landing strategies and make some suggestions or critiques. :)
By blindrodie
#402566
JEBUS, I'll say this about those "intense landings". Robert always keeps his eyes on the prize (always pick your spot and land on it) and he carries plenty of speed all the way in. I think he needs a drogue chute as well...

8)
User avatar
By DMarley
#402569
blindrodie wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 7:45 am
JEBUS, I'll say this about those "intense landings". Robert always keeps his eyes on the prize (always pick your spot and land on it) and he carries plenty of speed all the way in. I think he needs a drogue chute as well...

8)
Fer sure about the drogue, at least on his McClure - Greeley XC landing, which appeared to be a downhill flair.
Especially liked his Bear Mtn landing @ 3:06. And of course his perfect belly slide-in at Diablo (?) @ 4:15.
Robert isn't so Holy as to not use all the tricks up his sleeves, including the F-8 approach in his "Dunlap Reversed" landing @ 5:45.

But hey guys... I'm the one who just hijacked this thread and so this is all about ME and MY flying now. Ok?! Right?! :)

"Doug's Intense Landings" vid will be out shortly. Right. I suppose they're intense for an H2 at least. :P
User avatar
By remmoore
#402573
DMarley wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 2:32 pm
And of course his perfect belly slide-in at Diablo (?) @ 4:15.
I was there on that day, for a fly-in. There were a bunch of experienced pilots who wouldn't launch - mostly because they feared the infamous Thousand LZ. Rob and I were the only ones to launch that day - I was especially impressed because he had never done the Thousand before, and it was blowing cross in the LZ at a pretty decent clip. He also had to contend with hikers not paying any attention and crossing right through the small landing spot. He did a darn good job, all things considered!

Personally, I've long used one hand on the upright and one on the basetube for good approach control. I can fly fast, but I'm not fully prone. I take this hand position as I go into whatever landing approach I'm going to make, and don't move my second hand to the upright until I'm in ground effect and there's no more bar pressure.

RM
User avatar
By DMarley
#402576
remmoore wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 5:48 pm
.... He also had to contend with hikers not paying any attention and crossing right through the small landing spot. He did a darn good job, all things considered!

Personally, I've long used one hand on the upright and one on the basetube for good approach control. I can fly fast, but I'm not fully prone. I take this hand position as I go into whatever landing approach I'm going to make, and don't move my second hand to the upright until I'm in ground effect and there's no more bar pressure.

RM
I was giving Rob props for a nice, smooth, belly-buster without snagging the control bar. It looked gusty in the vid. Likely was worse.
I've considered strapping a small compressed air horn to my harness or possibly a forearm to alert others in the air or on the ground who have their attention focused elsewhere, many times loitering right in the middle of an RLF landing strip.

Good tip about keeping the hand on the control bar until just before the flare as pitch pressure cease. I would gather that this allows the pilot good mechanical advantage for controlling pitch and for ensuring the wings stay level right up to a moment before the flare.
I'll try this next time I land on a flat strip. Much of my landings are FOTW stuff, so the timing becomes more and more compressed as the landing slope increases in steepness. At least that is what I've found. Unless you have a better method....?
Last edited by DMarley on Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By EricH
#402577


I teach my students to come in one up, one down as they get in stronger conditions, watch how she get the hang straps all the way parallel to the downtubes and even beyond. If you're landing in mild conditions having both hands on the downtubes is an advantage because you don't have to transition any hands, you can keep your hands low on the downtubes and just walk them up as you slow down as Lauren does. There is a very experienced, very talented local pilot that is advocating new pilots come in with both hands on the basetube. One of the problems is that he flies high performance gliders, and single surface gliders that most of the new pilots are flying don't have near the energy retention making the hand transition difficult at best, and impossible at times. As someone else mentioned, I also like the triangulation of one up, one down.

Robert takes it to the extreme, I prefer to only use that hand position up high because I want to be more upright near the ground. Belly landings aren't graceful or funny, they're very dangerous in my opinion. Leading with your most valuable, weakest part of your body, head and neck, instead of with your strongest muscles and biggest bones doesn't make sense. He was the first one of my students to use a GoPro, and it completely changed my teaching. I asked him to also upload his flights to Leonardo, and since then a lot of my teaching comes through text and phone calls. I can watch pilot's flights in detail to give them immediate, exacting feedback from the comfort of my home.

I think every instructor and school should be using these invaluable tools, unfortunately there are none that have anywhere near the amount of video as my school (sorry for the brag;) https://www.youtube.com/user/BayAreaHG
It's also a resume of my students over the last 7 years. The first 19 years of my flying I videoed two of my flights, now with the smaller cameras I video almost every one of my flights, and every continuing student. GREAT way to learn!
User avatar
By DMarley
#402586
First off, I appreciate any and all the input, and I am sure other pilots do as well. The following arguments are only to spur further discussion and ideas.
Second, I'm keeping my eye on the XC pie and the probable impromptu out-landings, so I'm focused on developing those skills required to remain in good working order. I am not interested in pursuing a fishbowl pilot career. So please keep this in mind when I lean to the devil's advocate side. :shock:
EricH wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:53 pm
I teach my students to come in one up, one down as they get in stronger conditions, watch how she get the hang straps all the way parallel to the downtubes and even beyond. If you're landing in mild conditions having both hands on the downtubes is an advantage because you don't have to transition any hands, you can keep your hands low on the downtubes and just walk them up as you slow down as Lauren does.
The uphill LZ in which I have much of my landings at present provides only mild conditions during the later stages of glass-off or early in the morning. Other times it is a bumpy ride all the way in, with a probable chance of rotor and back-winding from either the hill or a group of trees if finding oneself low near the base of the hill with some cross or head winds (found heavy sink on final a few times, other times have bubbles lifting off). The easiest conditions here are with a quartering or trailing wind. I've found that for full control, it's best to transition the remaining hand from the control bar as late as possible, usually while 'zooming' up the hill face. To achieve an adequate amount of 'zoom-time ' up the hill requires a good dive prior to rotation, at least with the falcon. Yes, if conditions seem to be smooth and consistent, the transitions can occur sometime before the rotation. But even then, I'd rather not assume surface conditions are calm, and practicing quick, accurate timing with high-energy approaches in easy conditions is always the best time to teach and reinforce eye-motor timing compared to a relaxed, 'safer' approach. I'd rather burn it in with more than enough energy rather than taking a risk of not quite enough energy and flubbing it up.
There are other pilots (h2, h3's) that approach the hill more timidly, and rarely if ever achieve a spectator-approved landing.
There is a very experienced, very talented local pilot that is advocating new pilots come in with both hands on the basetube. One of the problems is that he flies high performance gliders, and single surface gliders that most of the new pilots are flying don't have near the energy retention making the hand transition difficult at best, and impossible at times. As someone else mentioned, I also like the triangulation of one up, one down.
I know that I will have a DS glider in my near future, so what better time to iron out the timing now rather than later. Plus, bringing the ship into GE on the control bar allows the pilot to be quite aggressive with inputs if conditions require. Why not practice for this in all conditions?
Robert takes it to the extreme, I prefer to only use that hand position up high because I want to be more upright near the ground. Belly landings aren't graceful or funny, they're very dangerous in my opinion. Leading with your most valuable, weakest part of your body, head and neck, instead of with your strongest muscles and biggest bones doesn't make sense.
The thing about being upright at a high AGL is that if you trigger bubble on final glide, there would be a much longer period of time for the transition from upright to more prone, throwing the pilot off glide slope more so than if already in a semi-prone posture. In a semi-prone posture, the pilot's waist does not interfere with the control bar being thrown back, and the pilot can thrust her body forward to where her thighs or knees are at the bar, if required. Much quicker reaction can occur. There have been multiple times when this has saved me from being thrown up off my glide slope, and likely over the ridge of the landing hill, down the other side and into the awaiting trees.

Belly landings are not the prescribed method of landing. Obviously. But just as in any other aspect of flying, it's better to have a bulging toolbox rather than relying on one or two basic tools to do the job. If proficient with each tool, gnarly looking or not, the pilot will get the job done without much adieu. Looking at Rob's example, I am presuming that due to the hiker being on his optimum final, he had to change to a non-optimum final, possibly directly downwind of the hill, and landed within a rotor.
A similar situation happened with a pilot landing seconds before me on the preferred landing area of a hill. I had to choose a different final, which put me in a boat-load of sink, and then rotor just as I was in rotation to climb and 'land' up the hill. With more experience and tools in this kind of situation, I would have not attempted a flare, but would have done what Robert did. I felt the back-wind even though I was coming in hot, but attempted the flare anyway, all to the detriment of a barely bent DT and a little grass staining on my harness. Lesson learned: if your airspeed drops unexpectedly and ground speed increases while very close to Terra-Firma, be aware of all your tools, and don't be apposed to a wheeled, belly landing.
I think every instructor and school should be using these invaluable tools, unfortunately there are none that have anywhere near the amount of video as my school (sorry for the brag;) https://www.youtube.com/user/BayAreaHG
It's also a resume of my students over the last 7 years. The first 19 years of my flying I videoed two of my flights, now with the smaller cameras I video almost every one of my flights, and every continuing student. GREAT way to learn!
I fully agree. I've learned much about my flying while viewing, reviewing, and frame-by-frame dissection of my vids, especially launch and landing sequences. There are only two landings that I missed reviewing because the camera went dead just before the approaches. One of them had to be my most 'intense' approach and landing sequence so far, into a very RLF.

Eric, you have an excellent methodology for teaching H2's. Thank you for your suggestions.
:)
  • 1
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7

Thanks for the tour. Looked like you just walked i[…]

Well that was worth the wait! Mostly clear air m[…]

Clear L.A. Skies on Friday!

Well mate you just flew above those walls :lol: […]

involuntarylist

Ive had enough. More than enough agitating peopl[…]