.

.

All things hang gliding. This is the main forum. New users, introduce yourself.

Moderators: sg, mods

User avatar
By joefaust
#378884
The 5-ft-pack HG Movement
======================
Anyone is invited to be part of the exploratory 5-ft-pack HG Movement.
What can you conceive more silly and extravagant than to suppose a man racking his brains, and studying night and day how to fly?

— William Law, 'A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life XI,' 1728.
=====================================================
Place your ideas, sketches, experiment reports, tests, etc. in front of the world.
The Movement has been underway in other HG forums for some time now.
The Movement may have an exciting presence in this forum also.
Examine all the technologies and possibilities; bring the best forward for examination.
=====================================================

Starting:
1. Bring forward all the various options from the hybrid inflatable worlds.
2. Examine splinted bladdered encased spars.
3. Explore foldable pre-stressed shells set in pack in accordion means.
4. Combine technologies where needed.
5. Explore deployable spars.
6. Examine soft-cabling options.
7. Explore all the other hang gliding forums for sharings on the Movement.
8. Respect niche HG activity; that is, one size need not fit all. Specialize designs to meet the niche activity.
9. Be ready to alter the Movement to "5-ft-pack-or-shorter HG Movement".
10. Get architects and engineers interested in the Movement. And artists.
11. Consider Safe-Splat and also High-Hat enhancements all in the same pack.
12. Trust that ways will be found and developed that will bring forward very low-volume low-mass convenient quickly-assembled and quickly packed HGs. The adventure during fulfilling such trust may be choice and wondrous. Be a part of this Movement.

..... There are many more seed starting points; bring those in. Then All are invited to forward the matter to many optional completions.

======================================
===================================
Wed Jun 10, 2015 wrote: This topic is dedicated to the "The 5 ft-pack-HG Movement"
Move it forward! Some top designs are anticipated one day!. Ease of assembly and packing is invited. Safety is paramount.
Designs need not be fit for "all possible uses", but may be with limited activity. Consider "Dandy Handy Dockweiler" sledders in conservative airs. Yet consider more strenuous tasking also. Aim for bus-ability. Consider wearing toted sail. Consider having all tote parts play a part in the designs. Explore sail wrap after frame up; sail off first and then frame packing. Explore telescopic spars, tapered spars, angle cross-section. Consider fiberglass, carbon-fiber, titanium. Consider non-metal cables. Consider space frames. Consider whatever might bring to hang gliding a busable 5-ft long pack. Stay with airframes for coupling with pilot forces. Consider putting aside cars and trucks. Consider wheels or skid for drag or wheeled tote. Consider ribs that snap two parts on either side of the sail for no-pockets. Consider bags for the wing-wrap. Etc.
:punch:

=======================
Bringing in Hoosier_eagle's post in a different topic:
Posted: Sat Nov 21, 2015 10:23 am
I just don't think we can overstate, just how detrimental the lack of a true, quick short pack intermediate glider in the US is to the growth in the number of hang glider pilots. Even if it is too heavy to hike with, the requirement for long break down times on the only available model (Falcon 4), exclude it as a real option for regular weekly or daily short packing. Technological developments have made paragliding more accessible and safe for pilots, but lack of technological innovation has left hang gliding in the dust (yes, grounded).

On a personal note, despite my deep love of the sport, this factor alone has almost driven me completely out of it. My car with rack can no longer be relied upon for road trips. And, I cannot afford a new or used car right now. So here, me, my rack, my glider, and jalopy sit in Louisville, KY. Because of it, I have not been able to fly for months. I am heartbroken. If I had a paraglider, I could rent a small car, stuff the wing in the back, and go. I could take it as my second bag on a commercial flight. When you are talking about young folks with limited resources, lack of portability and packability is a HUGE, HUGE issue. I am lucky, I have a house. All the college and inner city kids that I introduce to the sport live in apartments. There is absolutely no way they have space to store a 16 - 18 ft (5 - 6 m) long hang glider. Heck most of their rooms are only 9 - 12 feet wide, and located up switchback staircases on upper floors. And they are certainly not bringing this huge long glider to their parents, just so they can hear them berate them for doing such activities. A paraglider nicely hides in the closet or the trunk of the car when mom stops by.

In short, lack of a quick 2m pack option is effectively killing this sport, and many seasoned pilots understandably have trouble seeing it as the HUGE problem that it is, because they have all their stuff already built, own homes, own vehicles, etc. Really, until this problem is addressed head on, then absolutely, positively, everything else we do is to increase the number of young HG pilots is for pretty much for naught. You see, I teach college and can affirmatively tell you that nothing you would SAY about paragliding would deter my college students from taking up paragliding over hang gliding, because hang gliding is quite simply just not a practical option for them. Period. Can't pack it, can't store it, can't hide it from mom and dad, can't transport it. I play videos at my college every single year, hoping some will take up the sport. Initially they are all very interested. Sadly, once they do a little research and realize how hard it is to carry the thing, they bolt to paragliding.

Solution? Well, maybe, instead of crowd sourcing for more promotional videos to try to get more folks in the sport, we could crowd source to fund some innovation and design grants, to be issued to individuals for the development of truly portable gliders. Let's get this monkey off our backs and move on to packing these babies INSIDE our vehicles, or on NORMAL size luggage racks. Then, we might actually get enough young beginner and intermediate pilots to support the future of this sport.

Oh, and by the way, about my height and those big ass control frames...
====================
Curved wing stowed in flat-form coil with easy extension and quick packing:
Attachments
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 11.40.18 AM.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 11.40.18 AM.png (156.83 KiB) Viewed 10175 times
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 4.45.37 PM.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 4.45.37 PM.png (179.01 KiB) Viewed 10092 times
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 4.59.57 PM.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 4.59.57 PM.png (153.77 KiB) Viewed 10085 times
Last edited by joefaust on Sun Nov 22, 2015 8:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By TjW
#378901
You could always build a Whitney Porta-wing.
User avatar
By joefaust
#378902
That ever remains an option, especially with mods for reflex or "high-hat for pitch control." What are other options?
=========================================================
An aeronautical engineer and hang glider pilot wrote: Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:29 am

I think this is a very important topic for the future of hang gliding.

My Wills Wing Falcon III has a short pack option that lets me break it down to a relatively small length. But it takes a fair amount of work to do (I've only done it once so far). It also seems that some of the parts involved aren't designed to withstand repeated short packing on a regular basis without wearing out.

I think having an easy way to put the sail onto a mostly assembled frame would help a lot. That might involve some means (other than sewing) to fasten the sail to itself as it is wrapped around various poles and wires. That makes me think of things like zippers and velcro, but they have structural issues that would need to be resolved.

Very good topic Joe!!!
============================
UK hang glider designer pioneer wrote: ARP » Wed Jun 10, 2015 1:41 pm

I am looking at a pack length of 2m which should still be bus-able (just) Anything smaller means more joins which add weight. Battens remain in the sails which concertina to the keel, so pack width is greater but it has all got to go somewhere. Wing L/E stiffening plastic sheet will be exoskeletal so it can be rolled up for packing but fitted like a nose cone (Velcro) and will provide a smooth surface for air flow. Weight should be around 20kg. Some cables need to be dis/connected but assembly time reasonably quick.

Just need the time to get around to building it.

Tony
===============================================
A worker in the HG field whose son was first known pilot of a stick-enhanced laterally fully limp gliding kite glider wrote: Returning theme in my mind:
"sail may be separate from frame"
== Frame up. Then place the skin on the frame.
== Frame would be fully visible at each session assembly.
== Tote: Sail or skin might be worn on the body during tote on bus or train.

=================================================
Hang gliding is blessed with multiple niche activities that interest some pilots. One need not participate in all possible niche activities. Fun, healthy, and safe participation in one niche may be fully satisfactory. Exploring the pros and cons of possible niche activities may be enlightening, perhaps a preamble to new decision and commitment; and perhaps a new freedom of spirit. The 5-ft-packed-HG movement (perhaps up to 2 m; and some solutions might pack to 4 ft or 1 m or less; bring it on) is a niche activity in hang gliding world. One may play in this niche with various amounts of energy. Some persons will be with high focus. Potential effects on hang gliding from this niche activity may be very great.
=================================================

Another returning theme: solutions involving positive inflation of frame members. Specialized encased air beams?

=================================================
Offered toward the essence of this topic is the following page for potential careful study and meditation:
"Sunday, June 8, 2008
Weekend Wings #20: Inflatable Aircraft"
:idea: ==> http://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com ... craft.html

==========================
==========================
Last edited by joefaust on Sun Nov 22, 2015 10:19 pm, edited 3 times in total.
User avatar
By Fred Wilson
#378905
The entire range of FexAmerica Hang Gliders in current production are all Short Pack.
http://www.fexamerica.com/

All European manufacturers produce short pack gliders.

Search for Short Pack here on the .org and you will see 100 + previous posts on this topic.
User avatar
By Cool Breeze
#378916
Why not telescoping leading edge and keel? Seems like you don't need the same diameter leading edge towards the tips.
User avatar
By joefaust
#378918
Hi Fred ! Yes Fex' 6-ft-"short" pack has been an option. The early Burgfex at 24 lb invites attention. The current 7075-T6 has been important. Thorough study of Fex users forms a strand of "short pack" text that will inform the "5-ft-or-less HG pack Movement.

What will 5-ft-or-less give in the coming future that the 6-ft-or-greater missed?
What system weights will be coming in for solutions in the 5-ft-or-less Movement?
What variety of HG designs will appear? Materials? Structural methods? Ease of assembly? Niche uses? Opportunities for tote and travel and hike? Total volume of the packs? Durability? Solutions for niche activity? Fex is attractive for some purposes. But what will the designs be that win robustly the convenience competition? Competition with Fex and other "short" packed HGs will arrive from shorter, lighter, and operationally quicker solutions.

In the coming solution set there will be some HGs that will hardly be noticed when carried by the pilot on a public city bus. A bulbous 6-ft pack has still a considerable intimidation presence on a public city passenger bus; lowering the intimidation quotient may be part of the Movement. Some solutions will be coming in less than the 20 lb point; others will be heavier but still low in volume.

Packing strategies arriving from nested angles, nested zees, and soft cabling will be present in some niche-HG-activity solutions. Pilot-worn sail or wing parts will be part of some solutions.

The Fex text is definitely kin to the present topic. But the Fex "short" is still too long for the present topic.
================================================
Nod to Cool Breeze:
Image
Image
User avatar
By joefaust
#378921
Splinted airbeams? One company is coining the ancient technology while giving high focus on such. "Tensairity" The registered trademark is distinct from the ancient method of splinting cores.

Image

Such will play in some solutions in the Movement.
Tensairty will compete with other air-bean technologies.

The realm of non-porous bladders encased in porous encasements compete with non-porous air beams. The two part system allows the bladder to be oversized and remaining relaxed while under significant air pressure; the dedicated encasements control form and does the tensional work. The play of tensairity and the bladder-encasement form a hybrid direction that has yet to be fully explored for HG purposes.

============================
It is entirely impossible for man to rise into the air and float there. For this you would need wings of tremendous dimensions and they would have to be moved at three feet per second. Only a fool would expect such a thing to be realized.

— Joseph de Lalande, member of the French Academy, 'Journal de Paris,' 18 May 1782
============================
Last edited by joefaust on Sun Nov 22, 2015 11:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By TjW
#378922
joefaust wrote:That ever remains an option, especially with mods for reflex or "high-hat for pitch control." What are other options?
=========================================================

Another returning theme: solutions involving positive inflation of frame members. Specialized encased air beams?

=================================================

Offered toward the essence of this topic is the following page for potential careful study and meditation:
"Sunday, June 8, 2008
Weekend Wings #20: Inflatable Aircraft"
http://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com ... craft.html

I spent most of the summer of 1976 working on an inflatable hang glider for Jim Bede.
This was not the helium-filled wing. I saw pictures of it then, and there are pictures on the internet now, but I never saw that in person.
The wing I worked with was a low-pressure energy structure, in the sense that you could maintain the structure as long as you had battery for the fan to pressurize it. It was a very low pressure system, so leaks were not really an issue. Think of a bounce house in the form of a Marske plank wing as a hang glider, and you wouldn't be far off.
It used a rudder with lines to the swing seat to turn, something like a Quicksilver.

It was easy to set up in the hangar -- unroll it, attach the control bar and power up the fan.
In the field, on a training hill, with wind and rocks, it wasn't so simple. When partially inflated, it would try to beat itself to death on the rocks.

It weighed in at about 75 pounds, and would fit in the trunk of a passenger car, though it was probably a little bulkier than a paraglider because the cloth was a lot stiffer.

Unfortunately, there was a sink rate -- don't remember exact values, it was fairly high but in the realm of values I'd actually experienced in other hang gliders -- at which the fan couldn't maintain the differential pressure to keep the wings stiff. I imagined sinking, the structure getting floppy, increasing the sink rate, which would increase the floppiness... so I only ever flew it on a small hill.

But it was an interesting experience, overall.

My takeaway from that is that if the pressure is high enough that atmospheric pressure is a negligible variable, then sealing and leaks are a critical problem. If the pressure is low enough that leaks are not really a problem, then rapid descents become a problem.
User avatar
By joefaust
#378923
TjW,
Thanks for any and all your recall on your experiences in the Bede realm!

Fabric, pressure-keeping valves, over-pressure valves, pumps, porosities, ...worth continued explorations.
=================================================

James R. Bede
https://www.google.com/patents/US3944169 FILED: July 12, 1974
and
https://www.google.com/patents/US3400904

Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bede_Wing
=================================================

Bede:
See image at site: http://www.bd5.com/BDWing.JPG
Caption at site: "Now here's something most people haven't seen -- Jim Bede's Flying Wing. It is inflatable, and survives to this day. In fact, it was auctioned in mid-1998."
========================
Sept. 1975, Popular Science:
Attachments
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 8.32.48 PM.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 8.32.48 PM.png (252.58 KiB) Viewed 9943 times
Last edited by joefaust on Mon Nov 23, 2015 8:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By raquo
#378927
Hey, thanks for bringing up my favourite HG design topic!

Hang gliders can certainly be made packable to 5 ft even with current technology. Two easy steps:

1) Take any *fex glider (packs to 6 ft), or a bowsprit glider like Bautek Astir (packs to 9 ft)
2) Divide the tubes into more pieces so that the longest one is 5 ft. Use exactly the same joints as in the original design, just more of them because there are more pieces now. They're very lightweight, it's not a real problem.

The real technological limitation is devising an easy and quick way to set up and breakdown from such a short length. The most intriguing approaches I've seen so far: Longbow, Delka, Brett's tensioned-spar designs, Sock hang glider (search this forum).

The company "Prospective Concepts" in Switzerland probably knows more than anyone else about inflatable wing structures. They've built quite a few prototypes with this idea including a Pneumagic hang glider: http://www.prospective-concepts.ch/html ... magic.html They are now focused on some sort of wing-shaped blimp project, so don't expect them to release the inflatable hang glider.

Inflatable designs look theoretically possible, but must be extremely hard to design and manufacture. With no established manufacturers exploring that option, I don't see a lone genius tackling that problem in the nearby future (prove me wrong, guys! Please!).

Rigid wings on the other hand should be much easier to design and to make portable – 90% of what you need to do is to design a strong enough modular spar. I'm not sure whether carbon D-tubes are amenable to this approach, but something like the aluminum framed spar of the Sock glider can be cut up pretty easily I think. There's a pic here: http://www.hanggliding.org/viewtopic.php?t=32471
User avatar
By Flyingseb
#378932
I'm surprised that nobody mentioned the Woopy Fly. It has been designed by the same guy who designed the Delka, with a clear target at security.
See the skier's bag? That's his Woopy!

[youtube]
[/youtube]
User avatar
By joefaust
#378937
Support for Flyingseb's note:
Clips from Woopy Jump video
Attachments
Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 4.52.26 AM.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 4.52.26 AM.png (57.51 KiB) Viewed 9832 times
Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 5.34.46 AM.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 5.34.46 AM.png (49.85 KiB) Viewed 9814 times
Last edited by joefaust on Mon Nov 23, 2015 8:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
By joefaust
#378940
raquo,
Excellent joins to the Movement topic. Thanks.
=========================================
The "sock" technique (put a sock over your feet in the morning) for "sailing" a base frame has high potential, IMO. Focus on presto-changeOH! frame. Then "sock it from left and from right; zip it closed. Fly.
Unzip; unsock. Presto-chango-bring-in-frame. Use socks to bag all.
=======================================================

Consider socks for modules, say five modules that butt to each other: central and then two modules for left and two modules for right.

=====================================
Notice that one may deploy inner structure within a sock.
Or deploy inner structure and then bring sock over the deployed structure.
Examining the differences of the two methods may be profitable.

=====================================
Notice that the bladder-encasement tactic is actually a "sock" method; the encasement socks the bladder.

And notice that "socks" may be in parts that zip or Velcro together for complete socking. Also, consider tucked-in edges of sock or sail parts as a frame sits ready for for being "dressed".

======================================
Look to solutions that are for DIY. Look to a return to "plans" given away free to public domain. Look to a collection of many DIY plans. Notice the niche use of the fast Woopy Jump. Well, niche hang gliding has hundreds of specialized activities; there need not be one super glider only. Designs for micro hang gliding at coastal sand dunes need not have all the bling of designs for thermal play.
=======================================
Bow HGs have been explored; but the exploring is not finished.
=======================================
Reefable trailing-edge module (RTEM) that is 1 ft in chord on a 30-ft span HG would add 30 sq ft of wing while cleaning up the TE for flutter matters. Resolving the quick attach of RTEM. Reefing, depending on structure method of RTEM, could be section pressed-flats, or coilable full length, or drop-stitch inflated, ...
=======================================
Reefable leading edge module (RLEM) might be placed onto a base wing structure. "placing" might be done by zipper, Velcro, tongue-groove, magnetics, ...
=======================================
X methods. Series of joined Xs. Deployable structures.
=======================================
Image
========================================
Image
========================================
Image
=======================================
Image

JOINING this linked discussion that holds further illustrations:
==>> http://www.reaa.ru/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.pl ... 6919005/30
===========
Clip from that discussion:
Image

==============
[youtube]
[/youtube]
==============
Goodyear dropstitch wing construction: Directions for HG wings?

[youtube]
[/youtube]

==> For study:
http://www.energykitesystems.net/Materi ... index.html
=====================
==> For study:
http://www.eng.nus.edu.sg/EResnews/0506/rd/rd9.html

=====================
User avatar
By TjW
#378946
joefaust wrote:TjW,
Thanks for any and all your recall on your experiences in the Bede realm!

Fabric, pressure-keeping valves, over-pressure valves, pumps, porosities, ...worth continued explorations.
=================================================
Just to reiterate: that wasn't the wing I worked on. I saw pictures of it on the Newton airport runway, but I never saw that one myself.

It would have been either horrendously expensive to fly, or extremely slow to deflate, I think. How much helium to inflate? How long to compress it all back into a cylinder?

Still, I have to admit it solves the problem of collapsing paragliders pretty neatly.
One of my first thoughts on seeing paragliders collapsing lo those many years ago was a spar made of a Kevlar sock with a urethane liner. The idea was to keep it fairly small volume, so that it could be inflated to fairly high pressure with a CO2 cartridge. It would run tip to tip, so that while you might lose ram air pressurization and the normal airfoil shape, it would be less likely to wind up as a wad of fabric after encountering turbulence.
By old newbie
#378960
TjW wrote:
joefaust wrote:TjW,
Thanks for any and all your recall on your experiences in the Bede realm!

Fabric, pressure-keeping valves, over-pressure valves, pumps, porosities, ...worth continued explorations.
=================================================
Just to reiterate: that wasn't the wing I worked on. I saw pictures of it on the Newton airport runway, but I never saw that one myself.

It would have been either horrendously expensive to fly, or extremely slow to deflate, I think. How much helium to inflate? How long to compress it all back into a cylinder?

Still, I have to admit it solves the problem of collapsing paragliders pretty neatly.
One of my first thoughts on seeing paragliders collapsing lo those many years ago was a spar made of a Kevlar sock with a urethane liner. The idea was to keep it fairly small volume, so that it could be inflated to fairly high pressure with a CO2 cartridge. It would run tip to tip, so that while you might lose ram air pressurization and the normal airfoil shape, it would be less likely to wind up as a wad of fabric after encountering turbulence.

Except the collapse is a good thing. I don't want a rigid wing on string 20' above my head
User avatar
By TjW
#378967
old newbie wrote:
TjW wrote:
joefaust wrote:TjW,
Thanks for any and all your recall on your experiences in the Bede realm!

Fabric, pressure-keeping valves, over-pressure valves, pumps, porosities, ...worth continued explorations.
=================================================
Just to reiterate: that wasn't the wing I worked on. I saw pictures of it on the Newton airport runway, but I never saw that one myself.

It would have been either horrendously expensive to fly, or extremely slow to deflate, I think. How much helium to inflate? How long to compress it all back into a cylinder?

Still, I have to admit it solves the problem of collapsing paragliders pretty neatly.
One of my first thoughts on seeing paragliders collapsing lo those many years ago was a spar made of a Kevlar sock with a urethane liner. The idea was to keep it fairly small volume, so that it could be inflated to fairly high pressure with a CO2 cartridge. It would run tip to tip, so that while you might lose ram air pressurization and the normal airfoil shape, it would be less likely to wind up as a wad of fabric after encountering turbulence.

Except the collapse is a good thing. I don't want a rigid wing on string 20' above my head
But it wouldn't be rigid. It would be a limp fabric wing that just happened to be sort of spring-loaded to extend to most of its span so that it can reinflate easily without tying itself in a knot.

It's not really worth arguing about, though.
Hang glider pilots mostly wouldn't be interested in anything that looks like a paraglider.
Paraglider pilots aren't interested in the idea because they seem to think it's safe enough already. "Active piloting" got quoted to me a lot.

I have to admit, this is the first time I've heard anyone maintain that a collapse is a good thing.
By old newbie
#378969
TjW wrote:
old newbie wrote:
TjW wrote: Just to reiterate: that wasn't the wing I worked on. I saw pictures of it on the Newton airport runway, but I never saw that one myself.

It would have been either horrendously expensive to fly, or extremely slow to deflate, I think. How much helium to inflate? How long to compress it all back into a cylinder?

Still, I have to admit it solves the problem of collapsing paragliders pretty neatly.
One of my first thoughts on seeing paragliders collapsing lo those many years ago was a spar made of a Kevlar sock with a urethane liner. The idea was to keep it fairly small volume, so that it could be inflated to fairly high pressure with a CO2 cartridge. It would run tip to tip, so that while you might lose ram air pressurization and the normal airfoil shape, it would be less likely to wind up as a wad of fabric after encountering turbulence.

Except the collapse is a good thing. I don't want a rigid wing on string 20' above my head
But it wouldn't be rigid. It would be a limp fabric wing that just happened to be sort of spring-loaded to extend to most of its span so that it can reinflate easily without tying itself in a knot.

It's not really worth arguing about, though.
Hang glider pilots mostly wouldn't be interested in anything that looks like a paraglider.
Paraglider pilots aren't interested in the idea because they seem to think it's safe enough already. "Active piloting" got quoted to me a lot.

I have to admit, this is the first time I've heard anyone maintain that a collapse is a good thing.
you have to think of the collapse as a fail safe for pitch control. Wing gets too far out in front of you it would continue to dive and you would get wrapped around the glider or land on top of it. We actually don't think they are safe enough and they have been evolving rapidly. Collapse resistance and how they behave when they collapse is a balancing act.
By old newbie
#378971
If your hang strap was 20 feet long you would tumble fairly regularly
User avatar
By joefaust
#378981
Image

Doublet X structures might fold and pack to 5 ft. Open to 10 ft and then expand to 7 ft chord or 6 ft chord or 5 ft chord, etc. Then sock it.

Unsock, reduce the X to the 10 ft; fold to 5 ft. Tie closed. Wrap sock about the pack.

==========================
Rough tease:
http://www.google.com/patents/US8387921

==========================
More rough tease:
https://www.google.com/patents/US8381460
==========================
Image
==========================
Post by fcolver » Tue Jun 16, 2015

Do you remember the man that Richard Miller rented a back house from in San Marcos (or Escondido) for a time? I think his name was Fred Hagan, or something similar? He was working on an inflated main spar for a hang glider that would have a deep, high lift airfoil. I saw the poly-sheet proto-spar and it was about 15" in dia. His plan was to keep it inflated with a small on-board battery powered blower. As far as I know, he never got beyond prototypes of the spar. The prototype I saw was a straight tube but I assumed that it would be tapered toward the tips in an actual airframe design.

He was going for general purpose hang gliding but as you indicate, if only to be used at Dockweiler then that would give a lot more possibilities in design.

Frank
User avatar
By joefaust
#378987
Hybrid inflated air beams:
Attachments
sketchAirBeamTwoBladdersWeb.png
sketchAirBeamTwoBladdersWeb.png (5.78 KiB) Viewed 9544 times
Base Bar Mounts

That helps, thanks

When I unzip the harness of my Mosquito NRG (and l[…]

:thumbsup: Props and pistons, there's nothing lik[…]

La Muela de Alarilla, Spain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deGoFShaMuw