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#405764
Flyking wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:37 pm
The number 1 rule in Hang Gliding at launch is Hook In. This guy needs to loose his Tandem rating for life I would of attempted a uphill downwind landing or a tree landing. This guy was an idiot to make you hang that long 98 % of people could not hang that long. You are a amazing Bro. :shark:
Leaving the failure to hook-in the passenger and any penalties/punishments because of it aside, the pilot did do a pretty good job of dealing with the total panic situation. Maintaining control of a tandem wing with one hand while hanging on to the passenger with the other may be a bit more difficult than some people might think, especially with the adverse control input caused by the weight and drag of the passenger hanging from the control bar. There is really no way to tell how any of us would have dealt with being in that situation.
#405765
What I am saying is the situation should of never happend in the first place . The pilot is totally responsible for the situation at hand. The client is totally in the zone he is not thinking about anytyhing else byut flying. He should not be responsible for hooking in unless during :withstupid: his instuction he was trained to hook in. I don't think the pilot should leave any responsibility to the Client. JMHO :withstupid:
#405790
That pilot will likely be the safest guy on the mountain from now on with this experience behind him. I hope wiser people are reviewing this case and this pilot's future flying career.
Taking his ticket permanently would be like cutting off your nose to spite your face. The sport would be loosing the experiences of that pilot , who would likely have passed down that hard-earned knowledge to other pilots had he remained in the sport.
Knee-jerk reactions kill.
#405792
DMarley wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:16 pm
That pilot will likely be the safest guy on the mountain from now on with this experience behind him. I hope wiser people are reviewing this case and this pilot's future flying career.
Taking his ticket permanently would be like cutting off your nose to spite your face. The sport would be loosing the experiences of that pilot , who would likely have passed down that hard-earned knowledge to other pilots had he remained in the sport.
Knee-jerk reactions kill.
I have not commented on the posts of banning him forever, because I happen to know the pilot (I guess it's him, have not contacted him directly since the incident, but from harness / helmet / wing colors I'm pretty sure it's him) and he is not the kind of thrill seeking, YOLO-crazy, adrenalin-junkie type of person. Made his solo licence around same time as me, allways concerned with safety, checking things twice etc. I can imagine how much this has depressed him. And of all pilots, this stupid, stupid mistake happens to him. I would give him another chance if I was in charge...
#405798
Yeah, I’d send friends and family on a flight with that guy if they wanted to (seeing how the pilot reacted to the situation successfully saving the passengers life).

In a random conversation with a stranger several years ago they said their flight in Switzerland was the best part of the entire vacation!
#405810
In the conclusion of this article https://www.fai.org/sites/default/files ... errors.pdf, written in 2004 by a safety psychologist:
Two things are indisputable. Firstly, human beings are prone to certain forms of error that occur in predictable ways and circumstances. Secondly, whilst human nature cannot be changed, the way equipment is designed and tasks carried out can be modified (...)
From a safety engineering point of view it is almost always preferable to directly modify the equipment or situation to make the error less likely or to trap it before the consequences become manifest. Thus design changes are the first priority. Training to deal with the possibility of error is the next best approach. Training must involve the ability to recognize hazardous situations and provide a clear and unambiguous response to that situation. Finally, education to increase awareness has a place in the scheme of things but in itself is unlikely to be completely effective.
The response by most organizations to events such as this is to follow exactly the reverse order of priority and generate some sporadic educational efforts (e.g., articles in safety magazines, discussion at meetings etc) instead of delivering the
targetted training and design solutions required.
Best, Raymond
#405811
HOOK IN to the wing before you get into the harness, period (full disclosure- I do not do this). DON'T EVER unhook. If you can do that, only the "other" 20 or 50 problems will need to be dealt with... :P

The price of failure to hook in your passenger? You never get to fly tandem again as PIC. Is that too simple? Are the results of this accident and the ensuing repercussions easy to sort out in a few words on an internet forum? NOPE.

I feel for the guy. He dodged a lifetime of mental anguish because his passenger lived. That's the "lucky" part of the story...

8)
#405839
Back in the 70's we used to take off with the passenger on our backs piggyback style ,no harness on the passenger and ,using a stirrup harness. Going prone had the passenger sitting between your buttocks an the small of your back with legs hanging down .
I know it sounds dangerous and there were risks but not hooking in was actually dealt with by the passenger as they would support themselves ,during launch from just below the main beener .

I would not do this today for fear of copycats in unsuitable conditions .(coastal 15 knots or forget it )



it only works well if the passenger was light and usually it was the chance to take your girlfriend to be or not to be on the thrill of her life ... now im heading off topic !

Check lists are what this is all about and human error will always be present . I know how disturbing this must be for the pilot and im sure that he would need councelling as would his passenger. Its hard to have any sympathy for him but any one of us can screw up and recover which is what happened here . Thanks for posting the video It will have some effect on saving others ,of that i am sure.

I always pullup and feel harness tight ,in fact i dont run with a lose glider in any take off ,although I know it does not suit some harnesses.
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