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All things hang gliding. This is the main forum. New users, introduce yourself.

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By Cmharliosne
#401827
Hey all,
Brand new to the forum.
I'm wondering if anyone has any information on the laws and rules of crossing state borders in a powered hang glider. Is it allowed, or even possible? Possible as in are there only certain areas people are allowed to fly in, or are there too many restricted areas when getting close to state borders. And to clear any other questions, I'm not talking about crossing international lines, only state lines, say Utah and Nevada.
Thanks everyone!
User avatar
By Lucky_Chevy
#401828
It's not a problem as long as you stay clear of air space and do not fly at night. Hang gliders cross state lines all the time. Crossing international borders would be a much bigger deal.
User avatar
By Rick M
#401830
We are governed by the FAA as ultralight vehicles. This is covered by what is commonly called "Part 103".

You can read these rules (they aren't very long) as your leisure. Follow this link on the USHPA site:

https://www.ushpa.org/page/flight-operations

Then click the first link under the "FAA Documents - General" section. This takes you to the FAA website where you can read part 103. It covers basic info about when and where you can fly.

But the short answer to your question is that state borders are irrelevant. No different than driving, walking, bike riding, etc.
By Nate
#401831
State lines don't matter.

I asked the Border Patrol before dangling a toe over into Mexico when flying the border fence near El Paso. They said no problemo flying back and forth, but to know that if I landed on the Mexican side, I had to return through the legal channels/port of entry.

User avatar
By NMERider
#401832
Cmharliosne wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:36 pm
Hey all,
Brand new to the forum.
I'm wondering if anyone has any information on the laws and rules of crossing state borders in a powered hang glider. Is it allowed, or even possible? Possible as in are there only certain areas people are allowed to fly in, or are there too many restricted areas when getting close to state borders. And to clear any other questions, I'm not talking about crossing international lines, only state lines, say Utah and Nevada.
Thanks everyone!
Be careful of what you carry on-board, especially with a powered ultralight vehicle. Anything that may be considered contraband can get you into a world of serious headaches and legal expenses if for some reason you are stopped and searched by any federal agent. Be certain there isn't even a trace of dope with you. There's a special law that classifies such an act as smuggling and an overly zealous federal agency or prosecutor can really bring down the wrath of Jeff Sessions on you.
User avatar
By red
#401835
NMERider wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:05 pm
Be careful of what you carry on-board, especially with a powered ultralight vehicle. Anything that may be considered contraband can get you into a world of serious headaches and legal expenses if for some reason you are stopped and searched by any federal agent. Be certain there isn't even a trace of dope with you. There's a special law that classifies such an act as smuggling and an overly zealous federal agency or prosecutor can really bring down the wrath of Jeff Sessions on you.
Cmharliosne,

The same applies to alcohol as well. This would be called "bootlegging," because the state or local taxes were not paid on alcohol purchased in another state.

Aside from such tax or dope issues, there is no problem crossing state lines. I'd still want to consult current FAA Sectional maps to avoid airspace restrictions, MOAs, et c. Check NOTAMS in case of wildfire restrictions, and know the boundaries of Native American reservations (which may require their own visas, permits, or or even passports). Some of the Native American nations have never surrendered to the U.S. Federal government, so you can be considered as an illegal alien on their land. Even U.S. military helicopters are not permitted to land at will on their sovereign soil. ( . . . as it should be.)
By thermaleo
#401836
>>>know the boundaries of Native American reservations (which may require their own visas, permits, or or even passports). Some of the Native American nations have never surrendered to the U.S. Federal government, so you can be considered as an illegal alien on their land. Even U.S. military helicopters are not permitted to land at will on their sovereign soil. ( . . . as it should be.)<<<


Hear Hear. And when you land on the bits that the Bundy bros and their pals are trying to annex tell 'em it belongs to the Paiutes first, then the rest of us, but it certainly doesn't belong to them!

Leo Jones
By Roadrunner71
#401842
You Guys should know this about Me. I think about my return to flying my Predator like known of you can know. Yes I am a {pilot who has flown, and I "WISH TO RETURN TO FLIGHT" I want to once again fly my Beloved Predator so Badly. I have even turned to flying a Sail-Plane as a means so that I can appease my Desire to once again Soar again.

wELL THANK-YOU FOR TOLERATING MY SITTING AND TYPING OUT MY THOUGHTS REGARDING MY pinning TO fly. Yes you guys all tolerate my typing regarding how I sit here at my Desk and I type out how I: "PINE TO FLY MY PREDATOR ONCE AGAIN" O-K this is enough of my silly GROUND BASED BLUBBERING. GOOD BY Chris McKeon 925-497-1059. CCMCK@GOLDSTATE.NET


So in closing:: i WANT TO SAY TO EACH OF YOU THAT: "i will be back flying my predator again" I hope to share the air up at Cloud Base with each of you.
By Cmharliosne
#401885
Thank you to every one of you!!
I will further look into part 103 as suggested. I read that hang gliders are fine for crossing state borders, under certain regulations, but I think my biggest concern was having the hang glider be powered. I thought maybe that would put it in a different class other than ultra light.
Also, I love the sound in that video of crossing the Mexico border. Very good addition to the video ha ha

Thank you all again for the help on clarifying my question.
User avatar
By magentabluesky
#401904
thermaleo wrote:
Wed Jan 03, 2018 12:30 am
Hear Hear. And when you land on the bits that the Bundy bros and their pals are trying to annex tell 'em it belongs to the Paiutes first, then the rest of us, but it certainly doesn't belong to them!
Leo Jones
It looks like the BLM and the Feds have their tail between their legs.

Nevada judge dismisses case against Cliven Bundy and sons, says government cannot retry them - LA Times
By thermaleo
#401907
>>It looks like the BLM and the Feds have their tail between their legs.

Nevada judge dismisses case against Cliven Bundy and sons, says government cannot retry them - LA Times<<

The Government lands, of the USA, belong to you, the people, that is all of us. It's government land, that means your land, be it Federal lands, such as National Forests, BLM lands, or State lands, it's not owned by private individuals or corporations,

On those millions and millions of acres you can do almost anything you like, with fewer restrictions than you will ever find on private lands. Subject to common laws you can camp, hike, ride, boat, fish, hunt, climb, ski, fly, get lost for a day or two, lie on your back under the starry universe on a summer night and listen to the crickets and the nighthawks and the coyotes, there among some of the most precious and gorgeous landscapes on our planet. We actually own our yet unsullied Serengeti of the North, that is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. You get all this, and it's mostly for free.

The downside of this is that in the guise of "public interest", which of course means "monied" interests, on the majority of our public lands, private extractive or exploitative interests get first dibs, which basically boils down to mining, logging, and ranching. This produces some revenue, but often does enormous and sometimes permanent damage to the landscape, and at huge taxpayer expense. You do still get to camp,hike,ride, hunt, etc, you just have to share that with toxic mine dumps (that you you will now have to pay to clean up), clear cut forests, and cow ravaged ecosystems. Remember, this is still your land.

If you want to see where this might go, if the States gain ownership of the Federal Lands, consider Texas which in 1850, in return for ceding claims to New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Oklahoma, was allowed to keep the Federal lands within its borders. By 1900, Texas had sold about 216,000,000 acres of public land, placing it into private ownership.

Leo Jones
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